The irresistible power of storytelling for organizations

“Good stories surprise us. They have compelling characters. They make us think, make us feel. They stick in our minds and help us remember ideas and concepts in a way that numbers and text on a slide with a bar graph don’t.” Read more

5 ways to repurpose your content

For all types of organizations, repurposing content – that is, repackaging and continuing to gain value from previously developed and published content – makes good business sense. You can’t create original content at all times, and your audience needs to hear your key messages regularly for them to be really engaged with your work. In addition, repurposing is especially useful for nonprofits, given limited resources. Creating original content can be very time consuming, not to mention expensive. Read more

18 no-cost ways writers can effectively promote their content

We can all agree that promoting content is essential for ensuring that it effectively reaches the right audiences.

But in many cases, there are very limited financial and human resources available to support content promotion, whether you work for an organization or independently. Read more

Before you hit ‘publish’, proofread your work by checking these 8 things

You may have just written a great piece of content and are ready to share it with the world, but if it hasn’t been proofread, stop the presses! Proofreading is essential for all written communications in a professional context, though non-professionals should also incorporate it into their writing regimen. Read more

Want to really engage your readers? Make your writing more conversational

Don’t get me wrong, there’s still a place for formal writing – take reports or technical  and research papers, for example. But in this day and age, a more conversational approach in your articles, social media posts, webpages and other communications will likely go a long way in truly engaging your audiences.

“Writing less formally just makes it easier to read,” says Kristina Leroux states in her post for Kivi’s Nonprofit Communications Blog. She adds: “And easy is always best when it comes to asking people to do things like give their money or volunteer their time.”

So, if you’re trying to make your writing less formal and more conversational, read Leroux’s tips below or her full article here:

1. Read Your Writing Out Loud

“Does it sound natural to you? If not, do some editing and try again,” says Leroux.

2. Talk to a Friend

Write like you’re writing about the topic to someone you’re comfortable with, like your best friend.

3. Use Contractions

In your less formal communications, replace “will not” with “won’t”, “she is” with “she’s”, etc.

4. Address Your Reader Directly

Leroux says: “What’s the number one rule of donor centric writing? Use “you” and “your” when referring to the reader. You should also refer to yourself by using “I” or “we” and “my” or “our” instead of “the organization” or other more institutional-sounding words.”

5. Start with Social

Social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook are perfect for practicing a more conversational approach in your communications. Once you’re comfortable on social media, you may then decide to apply a more conversational style to other types of communication.

Featured image: http://klarititemplateshop.com/, Flickr Creative Commons